Halifax, Nova Scotia

Get to know what it’s like to visit this destination.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Get to know what it’s like to visit this destination.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Get to know what it’s like to visit this destination.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Get to know what it’s like to visit this destination.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Get to know what it’s like to visit this destination.

Getting To Know Halifax

Halifax was settled by the British in 1746 to gain access to the rich cod resources in the surrounding waters and control over Halifax’s harbour, which is the second largest ice-free harbour in the world. Halifax’s strategic location near the Canadian, North American and North Atlantic trade routes made it a centre of international shipping and trade in the 18th century and again during WWII, when supplies were being sent to Europe.

Our All-Inclusive Visit

See the picturesque Citadel, constructed in 1856 as an eight-pointed-star structure designed to defend Halifax from invading forces. Today it is still populated by the 87th Highlander regiment, who regularly perform historic re-enactments inside the square. The Halifax Museum of the Atlantic offers an exceptional glimpse into Nova Scotia’s maritime heritage, with an emphasis on small craft and the massive allied World War II convoys that were assembled in the inner Halifax harbour. On our way out of town, we drive past the Fairlawn Cemetery and hear the compelling story of how 100 of the RMS Titanic victims were recovered and buried in this city. We then we continue along the craggy shoreline for the scenic drive to Peggy’s Cove, one of the loveliest maritime villages in Nova Scotia. Located in St. Margaret’s Bay, this active coastal village retains the character and flavour of an active residential community, with a vibrant fishing fleet, quaint multi-coloured homes and the iconic Peggy’s Cove lighthouse. Lunch will be taken in one of the local restaurants, after which there will be ample time to stroll through the community, explore the rocks surrounding the lighthouse and shop for typical Nova Scotian souvenirs in the local stores.

More About Halifax…

In 1917, two ships carrying explosives collided in Halifax Harbour, causing the largest human-made explosion prior to the dropping of the atomic bomb. Portions of Halifax were entirely wiped out by the blast and the resulting tsunami. Nevertheless, the city’s population grew as the first Great War brought the Royal Canadian Navy into the harbour.

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